VAWA Signed Today Includes New Requirements for College Sexual Assault Policies

The new Violence Against Women Act, which will be signed into law by President Obama today, will include additional requirements about colleges’ prevention of and response to sexual assault.  The inclusion of preventative education in the law is one of the more striking and important additions, according to NPR’s Morning Edition.  As many remember, the addition of preventative healthy sexuality education is one of the central goals of ASC, and has been improved at Haverford in the recent years.  Other tenets of the new law include the requirement that colleges provide additional resources to survivors of sexual violence.  So, is Haverford doing enough (check out the revamped Sexual Misconduct resource page for more info)?  What else could and should the college do, now that these requirements are clearly outlined in both Title IX and VAWA?

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Chains of oppression: Katie Roiphe, Lena Dunham and the sexual counter-revolution

Via Pennyred

Kink has been part of the sexual menu for so long that it’s hard to pretend anyone is shocked anymore when it turns up on the table. The practice of male masochism, for example, has become almost idiomatic when one is discussing Wall Street workers, or the British aristocracy – despite Rousseau and De Sade, the French still refer to sadomasochism as ‘La Vice Anglais.’

At no point, however, has anyone implied that men who want to be sexually dominated by women also want to be dominated by them socially and economically. Quite the opposite, if the long history of powerful men paying poor women to beat them up in backrooms is anything to go by. Apparently, though, a few smutty books about naughty professors wielding handcuffs are meant to prove that modern ‘working women’ (sic.) aren’t really as into all this liberation schtick as we make out.

In a cover story for Newsweek, noted rape apologist Katie Roiphe argues that the recent success of pop-porn bestseller ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ proves that even feminists secretly want to be shagged into submission by great, big, whip-wielding brutes. Not just in spite of our feminism, but because of our feminism. Roiphe argues that modern “working women” – I’m sorry, was there ever a time when women actually did no work? – find “the pressure of economic participation… all that strength and independence and desire and going out into the world”…”exhausting.” Roiphe goes on to theorise, based on precisely one film, one tv show and one novel, that “for some, the more theatrical fantasies of sexual surrender offer a release, a vacation, an escape from the dreariness and hard work of equality.”

[Admin note: per our posting policy, this full-length article from another site has been excerpted. Visit Pennyred for the full article.]